Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Most Common Pet Poison

According to the records of the Animal Poison Control Center (APCC) of the ASPCA human prescription medications top the list of potential toxins most commonly ingested by pets for the seventh year in a row. The APCC handled more than 167,000 cases in 2014, the most recent year for which statistics are currently available, and 26,407 of those cases (about 16%) were from owners whose pets snatched and gobbled medications prescribed for family members.

Dogs and cats explore the world with their mouths, similar to small children. Unlike small children our pets are strong enough and agile enough to locate and secure pill containers then chew through them to consume the contents. Dogs are especially attracted to containers they observe their owners handling on a daily basis. Notice Fido watching you the next time you take your pills. What happens if you drop one, do you retrieve it faster than your pet?

Over-the-counter medications, including herbal and other natural supplements are also potential toxicants. Toxicity is all about dose per size and many natural products are innocuous in doses appropriate for adults but can be toxic for smaller pets. These products resulted in more calls in 2014 than in previous years (about 25,000 calls) and there are over 6,900 different products that comprise this category.

The Dog Squad

The sun fought its way through the cloud cover as I waited for the traffic to clear. I crossed Greenwood Avenue and made my way to the event entitled “Join the Dog Squad” at Phinney Books in the Phinney Ridge neighborhood of Seattle. I held the door to the book store open for a customer accompanied by her long-haired Dachshund then entered the small shop already crowded with book lovers and their dogs. I was there to talk about and read from my book “Travels With Charlize”.

Tracy Weber who lives in Phinney Ridge with her husband Marc and their German shepherd Tasha organized the event publicized as an opportunity to bring your dog to an event to meet and hear writers who write about dogs. She is the owner of Whole Life Yoga and the author of the award-winning Downward Dog Mysteries series.

Tracy reading

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tracy Weber reading from “Karma’s a Killer”.

Laura T. Coffey is a writer, editor and producer for TODAY.com and an award-winning journalist. She has written and edited hundreds of high-profile human-interest stories and now her first book, “My Old Dog: Rescued Pets with Remarkable Second Acts” is a book filled with eye-catching photos of animals of a certain age rescued by caregivers who care and stories that tug.

Laura reading

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Laura Coffey talking about how “My Old Dog” came to happen.

Waverly Fitzgerald and Curt Colbert are writers of considerable experience and a long history supporting and encouraging each other and their work. Their collaboration as Waverly Curtis was born when Curt came to one of their regular weekly meetings with an idea for a novel featuring a talking Chihuahua. The result was a collaboration on five novels and one novella in the “Barking Detective” series in which a talking Chihuahua helps his owner solve mysteries.

Waverly & Curt reading

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Waverly Curtis are doing their act, reading from the pages of “Silence of the Chihuahuas”.

The audience, including the dogs was attentive and we had a great question and answer session following out four presentations and yes, we even sold some books.

Five authors

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Five authors answering questions and below are the well-behaved dogs and their people waiting for the event to get started.

2016-01-30 15.30.19

Mitral Valve Disease

The mitral or left atrioventricular valve is one of four one-way valves in the heart. It controls blood flow from the left atrium, where oxygenated blood coming from the lungs collects, to the left ventricle where arterial blood is pumped out into the body. When the left ventricle contracts the mitral valve closes thus preventing blood from going back into the atrium. With a slight delay the aortic valve, the outlet valve from the left ventricle, opens and blood is pumped out into the arterial system.

Two kinds of mitral valve disease occur. Stenosis or narrowing of the valve results in interference with the blood’s ability to flow into the left ventricle. Insufficiency is the inability for the valve to close properly, and allows blood to be pumped back through the valve into the left atrium. Either condition can result in the valve not closing properly resulting in blood leaking, regurgitating, or flowing back into the left atrium. When this happens a murmur can usually be detected.

Mitral valve disease can be the result of a birth defect, or acquired as the result of bacterial or viral infections, some types of cancer that affect the heart muscle or just as a result of the aging process, particularly in smaller breeds of dogs. When the mitral valve does not function properly the ability of the left atrium to empty is compromised and the larger than normal volume of blood in the left atrium causes the pressure in that chamber to increase. As a result blood flow out of the lungs is compromised. Depending upon the severity of the lesion the outcome can be congestive heart failure characterized by pulmonary edema, the collection of fluid in the lungs.

Congenital mitral valve stenosis is more commonly found in Newfoundland and bull terrier breeds but can occur in any breed including mixed-breeds. Acquired mitral valve disease, particularly age associated degenerative valve disease, can occur in any breed of dog but appears to happen more frequently in the smaller breeds and is endemic in King Charles spaniels. Mitral valve disease in the King Charles spaniel has been shown to be a polygenetic disease that can afflict over fifty percent of all individuals of this breed by the time they are five years old. By age ten any of these dogs that survive almost always demonstrate signs of the condition.

Depending upon the severity and progression of the valve disease many dogs will have no clinical signs in the early stages. We usually notice that as the dog gets older it seems to lose energy. Your veterinarian will usually detect a murmur, the result of the blood regurgitating through the diseased valve. This results in turbulent flow and can be detected before any clinical signs are noticed. The loudness of the murmur is not always associated with the severity of disease. A small area of leaking can result in a very turbulent and noisy jet while a large area might not create enough turbulence to create a loud murmur. If the disease progresses the dog may exhibit exercise intolerance, coughing, trouble breathing, increased rate of respiration, weakness and collapse with exercise.

The diagnosis is usually made by auscultation, use of the stethoscope. If the dog is showing clinical signs of congestive heart failure your veterinarian, or the veterinary cardiologist to whom you have been referred, may need to take X-rays, an electrocardiogram, an ultra-sound exam or even catheterize the animal to determine the severity of the disease, the prognosis and the level of treatment required.

Treatment for this condition is palliative, designed to control the symptoms and delay the progression of the disease. Medical treatment cannot cure the problem. Because the valve usually degenerates slowly the treatment can change over time. A variety of drugs are used depending on the stage and progression of disease. These include diuretics, vasodilators, positive inotropic drugs (drugs that increase the force of contraction of the heart muscle) like digitalis, and other agents that may prove beneficial in certain individuals. In humans if the patient is showing signs of heart failure as a result of mitral valve disease the treatment of choice is open-heart surgery and heart valve replacement with a prosthetic valve. This is possible to do in dogs, and available in some very specialized institutions, but it is expensive and usually not an option to be considered.

This disease can also occur in cats and almost any other species of animals but is most commonly identified in dogs. The problem is reasonably easy for your veterinarian to detect and another good reason for regular physical exams.

TWC-front cover5star-shiny-web-review sticker

Reviewed by Lit Amri for Readers’ Favorite

“The purpose of this road trip was to try to figure out what I should do with my remaining years and how to do it. I’m seventy-six years old, and for more than fifty-two of those years, I was married to the only girl I ever truly loved. I’m not accustomed to making decisions on my own. Charlize is a good listener but doesn’t contribute much, except enthusiasm, to the decision-making process.” Travels with Charlize: In Search of Living Alone by David R. Gross is an open story of recovery.

Gross is on a mission to discover how to live without Rosalie, his late wife. Three-year-old Charlize is his third German shepherd, adopted less than two weeks after Rosalie’s passing. Charlize came with a different name, but, according to Gross who decided to mimic John Steinbeck’s Travels with Charley, he renamed her. Gross describes their bond as “two injured beings who need to support each other.” His travels with Charlize started with Old Blue, his 2012 Dodge Ram 1500 and The Frog, his camping trailer. Gross was pleased – “Frog pulled like a dream, sticking close to Old Blue’s tail.”

Travels with Charlize is truly engaging. Gross’s skill as a writer is evident. His narrative and thoughts not only focus on Rosalie and the travels, but also include his fond memories from his younger days, his sons, grandchildren and even his previous German shepherds. The pictures included in the book make the reading more appealing. The writing style is straightforward; I love the casual tone of the prose. Readers, whether or not traveling is their forte, should give this book a go and get to know Gross, and especially Charlize.

Free books

Starting on Jan. 16, 2015 Succeeding as a Student will be available for free on Kindle until Jan. 20th. Don’t miss this opportunity to help a college student learn to manage time, study effectively and efficiently and to take exams successfully. NewBookCoverFront2

Patent Ductus Arteriosus, also known as PDA, is a congenital heart defect that can be found in any breed or species of animal including humans. When I graduated from veterinary school in 1960 we were taught about this condition but very few, if any, veterinarians were prepared to do thoracic surgery to attempt a correction.

One of the most helpful things I learned, after graduating from veterinary school, was that most clients wouldn’t talk to me when I had a stethoscope in my ears. It was a perfect time to think about what I had observed and how to communicate with the client.

While I was in school Dr. Smith lectured to our class about heart murmurs, including the continuous murmur associated with a PDA. I remember him standing at the lectern making a very particular noise, mimicking this murmur. The sound was “whoosh, whoosh, whoosh, whoosh.” I never heard the murmur in an animal while still in school but the first time I did hear the murmur it sounded exactly like the noise Dr. Smith made while leaning into the microphone in the lecture hall. The condition can also be detected by feeling the animal’s pulse detecting what is described as a water -hammer or continuous pulse.

When trying to explain this condition to a client, or to students while I’m teaching, I resort to a sketch where I draw a rough outline of the heart with the aorta coming off the left ventricle and supplying the body with arterialized blood and the pulmonary artery coming off the right ventricle going to the lungs so carbon dioxide can be expelled from the blood and oxygen taken on.

Before any mammal is born the lungs haven’t inflated yet, the fetus doesn’t need blood to go the lungs. There’s an opening between the pulmonary artery and the aorta so the blood can cross over into the aorta because until the lungs are inflated the pressure in the pulmonary artery is higher than the pressure in the aorta. The blood crosses over through a structure called the ductus arteriosus.

As soon as the newborn takes a couple of breaths the alveoli, the little air sacs in the lungs, open and the blood vessels that surround each alveolus also open. The resistance to blood flow into the lungs is reduced and the blood pressure in the pulmonary artery drops below the blood pressure in the aorta. This causes the aortic side of the ductus arteriosus to close since the ductus is more of a slit than a tube. So normally the ductus closes shortly after the animal starts breathing. Unfortunately sometimes, for reasons not yet completely understood, the ductus stays open. When that happens, it’s called a patent ductus arteriosus. Since the pressure in the aorta is higher than the pressure in the pulmonary artery, the blood leaks continuously through the opening. With each heartbeat, the pressure increases in the aorta and that causes the leak to be greater.

When we listen to the heart of a normal animal it makes a noise that sounds like; lub dub . . . lub dub . . . lub dub.” A continuous murmur makes the whoosh, whoosh, whoosh sound as the pressure and blood flow into the pulmonary artery increase with each beat while the blood flows continuously surging with the beating heart.

The defect causes both the left and right sides of the heart to work harder and harder. The heart enlarges and finally it fails. Since my time in practice veterinary medicine has made enormous advances. We now have board certified veterinary surgeons capable of performing the relatively simple surgery to tie off the patent ductus. We also have board certified veterinary cardiologists who, if they make the diagnosis early enough, can use a catheter system to deliver a plug to the ductus and correct the problem without surgery. The key to a successful outcome is early diagnosis before the animal goes into heart failure and that means a thorough physical examination by your veterinarian for your new pet while it is still young.

I am running this post again because too many people seem to be searching for a way to kill their neighbor’s dog or cat. Since it was originally posted on Jan. 31, 2012 this post receives the most hits almost every day and many reach it by searching, “how to kill an animal with antifreeze” or similar queries. Find information here about how to save your pet if it drinks antifreeze.

This is one of the most common forms of poisoning seen in dogs and cats. It usually happens when the antifreeze drips from your vehicle’s radiator forming a puddle on the garage floor or driveway. The active ingredient in antifreeze is ethylene glycol a syrupy liquid that seems almost addictive to some pets. You must take special care if you change your antifreeze yourself, since pets can get into containers left open or spilled. It is possible for a cat to poison itself by walking through a puddle then licking its paws. As little as five tablespoons of commercial antifreeze is enough to kill a medium sized dog. If you see or suspect your pet has ingested antifreeze you should make it vomit, by giving it a teaspoonful of hydrogen peroxide per five pounds of body weight, but not more than three teaspoonfuls at a time. If it vomits or not, take it to your veterinarian as quickly as possible and explain what you think has happened. If your pet has already vomited, do not try to make it vomit more. Do not try to induce vomiting if the pet is showing signs of distress, shock, difficult breathing or is unconscious.

Ethylene glycol is also an ingredient in some liquid rust-inhibitors, incorporated in solar collectors, used in many chemical manufacturing processes and can be found in a variety of household products. Check the labels! To be most effective, your veterinarian must administer treatment within three to eight hours. Ethylene glycol is actually an alcohol converted, by enzymes in the liver, particularly alcohol dehydrogenase, into oxalic acid. The oxalic acid combines with calcium in the blood to form calcium oxalate crystals that block the nephrons in the kidneys and result in kidney failure.

Since ethylene glycol is an alcohol, the early signs of poisoning resemble drunkenness; euphoria and/or delirium, wobbly gait, uncoordinated movements, nausea as evidenced by excessive salivation, lip smacking, dry heaving, and vomiting. This phase can persist for about six hours and the animal may appear to be better, not so! If untreated the signs progress to excessive urination, diarrhea, rapid heart rate, depression, weakness and eventually into fainting, tremors, convulsive seizures, and coma, all signs of kidney failure.

If you arrive at the animal hospital in time and give a history of your pet ingesting antifreeze, or your veterinarian runs appropriate tests and makes the diagnosis, before signs of kidney failure occur, there is a good chance your pet will be saved. Treatment involves the induction of vomiting. Using activated charcoal to bind any ethylene glycol still in the digestive tract is not effective, but may be indicated when other toxins are suspected. Since 1996, your veterinarian has had access to fomepizole (Antizol-Vet). This drug is an effective antidote, if administered intravenously before kidney damage occurs. Back in the olden days, we used grain alcohol as an antidote, significantly less expensive than fomepizole. Alcohol dehydrogenase has about 100 times the affinity for grain alcohol than it does for ethylene glycol. When used as an antidote the liver metabolizes less ethylene glycol and fewer oxalate crystals form. Depending upon the severity of kidney damage it still might be possible to save your pet with aggressive fluid therapy to flush the kidneys, and other supportive treatment. Some specialty practices may be equipped to provide kidney (renal) dialysis. You do not want to know how much a kidney transplant will cost, but it is possible, in both dogs and cats, in specialized centers with the necessary equipment and experience.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,507 other followers